Insure Your Car for Less: A Practical Guide to Saving Money on Automobile Insurance

Insure Your Car for Less: A Practical Guide to Saving Money on Automobile Insurance

"Insure Your Car for Less is a must read for anybody who wants to save money on their car insurance."

The creator behind this book, David Goldstein, is a veteran of the insurance industry. He has worked as an insurance agent and adjuster for two of the largest insurance companies in the country, and now helps injured people take on the insurance companies at a successful law firm specializing in motor vehicle accidents.

In Insure Your Car for Less, David focuses on how to save money when applying for an auto insurance policy, and presents unique information that has rarely been discussed before.

The topics he discuses are more important then ever, as modern insurance companies have become large corporate

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3 Comments

  1. 3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Valuable Insights from David Goldstein, March 31, 2013
    By 
    Grady Harp (Los Angeles, CA United States) –
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Insure Your Car for Less: A Practical Guide to Saving Money on Automobile Insurance (Kindle Edition)
    Most people will look at the title of this book and think `Oh yes, another insurance salesman’s pitch to sell me another policy.’ Wrong! As author Goldstein subtitles this very informative book, this is `A practical guide to saving money on auto insurance that reveals industry secrets, common mistakes, and misconceptions that are virtually unknown to the general public’. Sound to good to be true, then purchase this little goldmine of information and facts and you’ll profit from the move.

    Right from the start in his introduction he begins to debunk fallacies, such as the concept that the facts insurance policy writers pay attention to are driving record and claims history: instead he states that the factors that determine our premiums are our occupation, education and credit history. Sounds more like buying a house than an insurance policy, but that is how Goldstein takes us through all the misconceptions that abound in that mysterious territory of auto insurance. Goldstein as been an insurance agent and then an adjuster for major insurance companies and he knows the ins and outs of the business very well. As he states, `To truly understand the underwriting principles that decide the premium, we first must have a basic understanding of how insurance companies make a profit and why they charge the rates they do’ and then he goes on to explain that our premiums are not the source of profit – it is the insurance companies’ investment of our money from the moment we start paying those premiums that makes money for the companies.

    From that basis the remainder of the book goes into detail as to how insurance companies use the information mentioned above as the drivers for deciding a premium – the importance of the type of education you have and the type of job you have, the reason why insurance companies like to have people with lapsed policies apply (as they can be labeled risks and thus be charged higher risk rates!), the rules and regulations of exploring credit ratings, the degree that car usage influences rates (some real surprises here), the type of car and the options on that automobile (expensive vehicle cost more to repair and are more prone to theft, etc but then measures of safety options in the car affect the premium, too), driver assignment, marital status, location of your car whether that be your home or where you park your car at night or day – all of these sections contain little known facts of how the insurance companies function in either offering or selling you insurance.

    The really positive aspect of this book is the manner in which the author addresses all of these issues. He is in fact sharing the truths about insurance as someone who has been in the seller’s seat. His encouragement to shop around to find the best policies instead of falling victim to the intimidation of the `big guys’ is information well taken. You’ll learn a lot from David Goldstein. Grady Harp, March 13

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  2. 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Clears up some of the mysteries about auto insurance premiums, March 29, 2013
    By 
    J. Chambers (Georgia, United States) –
    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)
      
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Insure Your Car for Less: A Practical Guide to Saving Money on Automobile Insurance (Kindle Edition)
    Author David Goldstein has, in my opinion, done a valuable service in de-mystifying how insurance companies determine premiums for auto policies. Like many people, I assumed that the most significant factors in setting premiums were driving record and claims history, plus the make and model of a vehicle. These are significant factors, but there are a number of other factors that also figure into the premium. Although it’s not a long book, I learned quite a bit from “Insure Your Car for Less,” including some interesting tidbits about auto insurance companies:

    * The difference in the amount that insurance companies collect in premiums isn’t much more than what they pay out in claims. Most of their profit comes from the interest they make from investing the premiums.
    * Insurance companies assign each driver into a “tier,” depending on information about the driver.

    The book is intended to help drivers move into a more preferred tier with lower premiums. There was a lot of useful information, including how to ensure that you’re in the highest possible tier. Granted, some things were no-brainers, but much of the information wasn’t at all obvious, such as:

    * Occupation and education matter. For example, if a college student also works a job, it may be advantageous to list their occupation as “college student.”
    * Many people may not be aware that they qualify for affiliate discounts. You have to ask.
    * Insurance companies rely in part on credit history to predict a driver’s behavior. The author notes that a driver can decline to have an insurance company use this information, although it may not be in their best interest to do so.
    * Some divorced people may actually qualify for married rates.
    * Driving record and claims history do matter, but there may be cases where it’s advantageous to be ruled at fault instead of not at fault.
    * Location counts. Read why car insurance rates are so much higher in Brooklyn than in neighboring borough Manhattan.

    Overall, the book is a quick read and a treasure trove of useful information for drivers. Consider that even a small change in your information could move you over the threshold into a higher tier with significantly lower premiums.

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  3. 5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Don’t look any further if you want to save money!, March 16, 2013
    By 

    This review is from: Insure Your Car for Less: A Practical Guide to Saving Money on Automobile Insurance (Kindle Edition)
    Until reading this book, I had no idea that anything other then my driving record had anything to do with my car insurance. Now I know better! I immediately started calling around to get some quotes, and was asked several of the questions discussed in this book. EVERY QUOTE I GOT WAS LOWER THEN MY CURRENT INSURANCE, and the best one was over $500 less. If you read this book you will save money.
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