Nice Co Car Insurance photos

Nice Co Car Insurance photos

A few nice co car insurance images I found:

Image from page 311 of “Railway Times” (1908)
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Identifier: railwaytimes101londuoft
Title: Railway Times
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: London
Contributing Library: Gerstein – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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assenger cars, 1,064; freight cars,33,525. The total capitalisation at the end of 1910, includingthe (Irand Prunk Pacific and affiliated lines, was §577,356,682. In regard to schemes for the benefit of employees, par-ticulars are givi-n of the Superannuation and Iroviclent Iund-Association, the insurance and Brovident Sojicty, and thePension Depart nient. When Sir Charles Rivers Wilson retired from the prcsideni:vin i<)09, .after 15 years service, Mr. .. W. Smithers .!•elected chairman of the board, while Mr. Charles ]L Hays .i^elected president, with headtiuarters at Montreal. By thisarrangement the i)rcsident becomes a resident of Canada.TiiR C.kANi) Trunk Pacific. The concluding section of the book deals with the GrandTrunk Iacilic Railway Company. This -company was in-corporated in ()ctobcr, 1903, under contract whereby theGrand Trunk Railway and the Dominion Government co-oi)eratc iu the construction of a line from .Moucton, S.li., to April 6 iqi: THE RAILWAY TIMES. 359

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Jrincc Rupert, 1^).C., v]uilly within Canadian territory. Thorailway is divided into two grand dnisions, the Eastern andthe Western. The Western J^ivision, extending from Winni-peg to Prince Rupert on tlie Iacific Coast, is sub-divided intothe trairic Section and the Mountain Section, and the entirehne is being constructed by the Grand Trunk Pacific RailwayCompany, and is to be completed by December i, 1913. Themileage of the Western Division is 1,755 niiles. The Eastern Division embraces main lines east of Winnipeg,comprising 1,804 miles, extending to Moncton, X.r?. Themain line will be constructed by and at the cost of the Cana-dian Ciovcrnment, under the supervision of the Commissionersof the Transcontinental Railway, and upon completion willbe leased to the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway for a periodof 50 years on the following terms :— For the first seven years the company shall operate thesame subject only to payment of Working Expenditure;for the next succeeding forty-three yea

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Image from page 495 of “The street railway review” (1891)
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev06amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co
Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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nts are provided for. and where taxes, insurance -^ir^^^^^C^^wt-^.-^ ^^iV C-^a-^lXi^ ^^^tn^ ^^^ Munth. v„.*-t-^^»-*^_-..« t>-t-^ ? iO bM. <f^ / y FIGURE 3. 482 (^ftlMd/lifa^AVa^9^ and interest are taken care of. The adoption of thesystem is due to B. F. Harris, Jr., general manager, whohas alwajs sought the most advanced methods of bookkeeping. The combination of interests calls for muchmore skill in the plan of a book keeping system thanusual, and Mr. Harris has succeeded very well. EIGHT THOUSAND AMPERE CIRCUITBREAKER. The largest automatic circuit breaker ever constructedhas recently been completed by the General ElectricCompany. It is designed to break a circuit of 8,000amperes and is to be used on a 160 volt circuit, althoughmade to handle the same current at 600 or 700 volts.This is a form K circuit breaker and differs only in size

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EIGHT THOUSAND AMPERE CIRCUIT BREAKER. from the well known K instruments used by the Gen-eral Electric Company on its standard railway generatorand feeder panels. The studs which carry the currentare 3^ inches in diameter, the base is 28 inches square.It is constructed to opened the circuit automatically atany point between 3.000 and 20,000 amperes, the open-ing point being arranged b) the adjustment of a tensionspring on the armature. Six electric cars were put upon the F street line,Washington, D. C, July 7, in place of the same numberof horse cars, and since then others have been graduallyadded. The process will be continued until the line isoperated wholly by electricity. The underground sys-tem is used. REMINDERS TO MOTORMEN. Among other numerous suggestions and warnings tomotormen issued by an eastern president of a very largesystem are some that are so frequently neglected oreven left out of rule books that we reprint them,although they are by no means new. • If motormen will

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Image from page 148 of “The Street railway journal” (1884)
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Identifier: streetrailwayjo121896newy
Title: The Street railway journal
Year: 1884 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Street-railroads Electric railroads Transportation
Publisher: New York : McGraw Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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independent of springscarrying the car body, situated inside the pedestals, and thereforerides softly and easily and free from rigidity. The truss for the carbody is so constructed and applied that it is absolutely free from con-tact with the springs or frame of the truck and is practically a partof the car body. In the effort to produce a truck embodying the very best ridingqualities, resulting not only in the comfort of the passenger, but inprolonging the life of both equipment and roadbed, simplicity ofconstruction and maximum strength have been observed at everypoint. » I ■ I ^ Electric Headlights. The accompanying engraving shows an electric headlight ofwhich F. E. Huntress & Company are agents, and which is manu-factured by Neal Electric Headlight Company. The advantages ofelectric headlights are many, among which may be mentioned thefact that there is no smell of oil when sitting on the front seat of anopen car, the cost of maintenance is very small, the expense of labor

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ELECTRIC HEADLIGHT. for cleaning and filling lamps is entirely avoided and they abolishkerosene from the car house, reducing liability from fire and lower-ing insurance rates. All of these facts make the cost of maintenanceof the electric over the oil lamp very great. The arrangement of the lamp is such that there is no interfer-ence with the lettering on the dashboard. The headlight is paintedthe same color as the dashboard, making it hardly noticeable during car construction requiring a perfect surface either for varnishing orpainting. It is heavy and substantial and made to work 30 ins.,36 ins., 42 ins., 48 ins. and 60 ins. wide. The drums are of steel, threein number, and upon them the sand-paperis placed and graded accord-ing to the work to be done. The first drum carries a coarse grade ofpaper, the second a fine grade for smoothing, and the third a finergrade for giving the material the polished surface. Each hasan oscillating or vibratory motion laterally across the material to

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.